No one wants to cut a tree that has been residing in their property for a long time, but sometimes due to reasons like overgrowth, damage due to storm or a disease or simply because of age. However, has anyone wondered, what happens to a tree once it is removed. While the trunk is turned into a mulch and the woods sent away to a furniture company but the real question is; what happens to the roots, since it is the part of the tree that is not removed.

There are two kinds of roots and each of them lead to a different type of consequence.

Non Aggressive Roots

While a professional team is busy removing a fallen oak tree in Vancouver, it is important to ask them about its roots to see whether they are aggressive or not.

For trees that do not root sprouts, it is not possible for it to regrow once it is removed and even the stump is reduced to mere chips. Large roots that are left behind underground may decompose slowly. Once the ground sinks to the location where these roots exist, filling the area with compost and let the grass grow up and fill the place.

On the other hand, remove debris, fill the area with compost and render it smooth. Then sprinkle some grass seeds, keep the area moist and let the grass grow and cover all the bare patches.

Aggressive Root Sprouts

For some trees, however, there is a constant growth of root sprouts even after the tree is removed and the stump is ground to mulch. These roots have been storing nutrients from the days when the tree was standing and possses sufficient energy that is required to grow sprouts. The species of tree that are responsible for the growth of such sprouts include cottonwoods, Russian olive and Siberian elm. These are also termed as invasive species because they spread way too rapidly and deprive other roots from their nutrients.

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